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Frequently Asked Questions

Most Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of the same questions from our customers, so to make it easy for you {and us!} we are listing our frequently asked questions here. If you have a question that has not been answered, checkout our Facebook Group - where a WHOLE COMMUNITY of homeschoolers who use Queen Homeschool products discuss all types of questions! If you would rather contact us, click here!

Where should I place my child in the Language Lessons books or Spelling Books?
What is the purpose of copywork?
Why aren't your copywork books in cursive?
Does copywork help with spelling?
Which copywork series should my child be in?
When should we switch from copywork to dictation?
Why are there no dotted lines in the copywork and Language Lessons books?
Can I teach all of my kids history/nature study together?
Can you tell me about the Charlotte Mason method?
What is a "Living Book?"
For what age are the "God's Plan for Growing Up" series written?

Where should I place my child in the Language Lessons books or Spelling Books?
A child should be placed according to SKILL level, not necessarily GRADE level. With that in mind, there are preview samples of each of the books in this series on our web site that you can view and print out to see which would be the best book for your child. As with all of our books, the "Language Lessons" books are not age or grade specific, but rather skill specific. Read the recommendations under each book title, look at the online preview samples of each book, and place your child according to his current skill level, progressing from there. Different children of the same age will often be using different levels, depending upon their skill level. This is normal. It is better to start a child at his skill level and let him progress than to start him in a certain level that you think he "should" be in, and have him struggle from the onset.

What is the purpose of copywork?
The purpose of copywork is to train a child to pay attention to detail. Traditionally, the purpose of copywork is not for handwriting, but rather to train a child to pay strict attention to the mechanics of the English language - where things are capitalized, how they are punctuated, proper usage, etc.

Why aren't your copywork books in cursive?
(See Above) We do have a series that teaches cursive writing using the principles of copywork, our "Pictures in Cursive" series.

Does copywork help with spelling?
It does, in general, because a child is forced to pay strict attention to the details of how words are spelled. For maximum benefit in using the principles of copywork to aid in spelling, see our "Learning to Spell Through Copywork" series. Free preview samples of each book are included online.

Which copywork series should my child be in?
The "Copywork for Young Ones" series is for children who are reading fluently. This series has lines directly underneath each lesson to be copied, so the younger child can easily copy the lessons directly beneath the original source. As the child progresses to the point where he is able to focus and refocus back and forth from the material being copied to a separate notebook, and is able to copy lengthier passages, he can move into the "Thematic Copywork Lessons" series.

When should we switch from copywork to dictation?
Copywork trains a child in the proper usage and mechanics of the English language. Dictation tests their knowledge of this proper usage, and is generally best begun once a child is to the point of regularly not making mistakes in their daily copywork exercises.

Why are there no dotted lines in the copywork and Language Lessons books?
Because homeschoolers use many different styles of handwriting, and because handwriting is not the focus of copywork, we have chosen to use a generic, plain line to copy the work onto.

Can I teach all of my kids history/nature study together?
Certainly! We usually do where we can. Not only does this make the teaching much easier, it keeps everyone "on the same page," which gives your family a common bond. Though you will have different students in the same book/study guide set, here is what we and many other families do:

   1. Mom reads the chapter for the day aloud to all students at the same time.
   2. The younger, non-readers, are done at this point.
   3. The older students will do the activities listed for that day in the study writing assignments will be determined by their age. For example, if you are doing the same study with children ages 5, 9, 13, and 17, the 5 year old, unless he is ready to research and write, will simply listen to the reading. The 9 year old might write a one paragraph report and do the other activities, the thirteen year old might write a full page report, and the seventeen year old might do a report of several pages.

Can you tell me about the Charlotte Mason method?
The answer to this question is multi-faceted, and quite lengthy, and can best be answered by purchasing our booklet, Meet Charlotte Mason: An Introduction to Her Methods, by Sandi Queen.

What is a "Living Book?"
Simply put, a "Living Book" is any book that brings the subject matter "to life" for the reader. A well-written, descriptive biography of George Washington, for example, is a living book if it gives a clear picture of what this man was like, what his life was all about, and gives the reader mental pictures of what the time period of Washington's life. A textbook, which simply gives small snippets of information and facts to memorize is not.

For what age are the "God's Plan for Growing Up" series written?
While these books were written for our own children for between the ages of eleven and thirteen, we realize that all families are different. Though the books are very conservatively written and illustrated, we recommend that the parent discern when their child is ready to discuss this information.
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